Psalm 12:6-7 and God’s Promise of Preservation

Psalm 12:6-7 is the clearest presentation of God’s promise to preserve His words found in the Bible.  Modern objections to its translation in the KJV, that would obscure or remove this promise, are without foundation.  The gender discordance between pronouns and antecedents found in the Hebrew text is not uncommon in the Psalms, especially when the subject is scripture; this is recognized even by modern translators in numerous other places.  Rather, it is modern translators who violate grammatical norms, mistranslating pronouns in person and number.  Finally, even apart from grammatical considerations in the original language (Hebrew), the English reader would naturally conclude from the theme and parallelism of Psalm 12 that the intended subject of God’s preservation is His “words”.  The Bible-believer should continue to understand and treasure Psalm 12:6-7 as properly translated in the King James Bible.

A study of this issue, titled God’s Promise of Preservation, has been added under Textual Studies.


The Answer to Preterism

“Verily I say unto you, This generation shall not pass, till all these things be fulfilled.” (Matthew 24:34)

Based on this verse, Preterists conclude that the 70th Week of Daniel must have occurred within the lifetime of those hearing this prophecy spoken by Jesus; thus, it took place in the 1st century and is a past event from our present point of view. Matthew 10:23 and 16:28 present similar challenges that are resolved within Preterism by placing the fulfillment of prophecy in the 1st century AD.

However, the tension created by Matthew 24:34 is not resolved by conceding that its prophecy was fulfilled in the past. Such a solution creates more problems than it solves, since it is self evident that the 2nd Coming of Christ (as described in the Bible) did not occur in the 1st century. Rather, the tension is revolved by the two-fold recognition of:  1) the contingent nature of the Kingdom, and 2) the mystery nature of the Church (Age).

A study of this issue, titled Answer to Preterism, has been added under Biblical Studies.


A Biblical Analogy for Faith

Calvinism, as part of its Doctrine of Total Depravity, has adopted a corpse/cadaver as a metaphor for the natural man.  Since a corpse is unable to believe, they argue the natural man is unable to believe apart from a preceding, supernatural, and sovereign work of regeneration by God.  But is the analogy of a corpse/cadaver for the natural man accurate?  Actually, the Bible uses a very different analogy.

A study of the proper analogy for sinful man and his ability to believe, titled Look and Live: A Biblical Analogy for Faith, has been added under Biblical Studies.


Prophecy versus Mystery

Much misunderstanding among students of the Bible results from a failure make proper distinctions. Indeed, scripture commands the student to “rightly divide the word of truth” (2Tim2:15). C. I. Scofield, in his classic booklet Rightly Dividing the Word of Truth, highlighted ten important distinctions; the very first chapter addresses proper distinctions between the Jew, the Gentile, and the Church of God. An article (with accompanying Chart) titled Distinctions between Prophecy and Mystery has been added under Biblical Studies which explores a related, but absolutely vital, distinction between prophecy and the mystery, which is the key to seeing the proper distinctions between: 1) the nation of Israel, her Messiah, and His coming Kingdom, versus 2) the Church (which is the Body of Christ), its Head, and the present dispensation.


Elect/Election in the Bible

The term “elect” simply means chosen, and “election” means to be chosen. In the Bible, these terms are used of:  1) Messiah/Christ, 2) the holy angels, and 3) the nation of Israel. The Lord Jesus Christ is perfect and without sin, so His election by God cannot have anything to do with personal salvation.  The holy angels are unfallen, such that they do not require salvation (and the fallen angels are not eligible for salvation).  However, by far the most common use of elect/election relates to the nation of Israel. The nation of Israel has always been comprised of both believing and unbelieving Jews (cf. Rom3:3; 9:6), so the election of Israel cannot pertain to the salvation of individual Jewish persons.

Biblical “election” is God’s choice of a person or persons for a particular purpose in His divine plan.  Christ was chosen by God to be the redeemer of believing humanity (Jn3:16).  The angels were chosen by God to be His governing and ministering spirits within the creation (Heb1:14).  And the nation of Israel was chosen by God for a myriad of reasons, but primarily to be His principal channel of revelation to fallen humanity, through which God brought forth both the Person of Messiah (Rom9:3-5) and the Holy Scriptures (Rom3:1-2).  These purposes have nothing to do with the personal salvation of the objects of God’s election.

Reformed theology’s notion that “election” is God’s choice of who He will save and who he will not, made before His work of creation and having nothing to do with faith on the part of its objects, finds no support in the Bible.

A full length article on this subject has been added under Biblical Studies.  God bless!


The Name of the LORD

The identification and etymology (and as a result the proper pronunciation) of the name of the one true God, Who has revealed Himself in the text of the Bible and in the Person of Jesus Christ, has long been disputed. The controversy appears to be shrouded in mystery, cloaked in myths and traditions, and largely propagated by various Jewish sects and a multitude of pseudo-Christian cults. However, when the Biblical record is consulted as the final authority on this matter (Isa8:20), the issue is not at all as ambiguous as many suggest. The identification and etymology of the name of God is clearly revealed in the Hebrew scriptures, and it’s proper pronunciation can be reliably inferred from their testimony.

A full length article on this subject has been added under Textual Studies.  God bless!


Hebrews: Press on to Spiritual Maturity in Christ

Bible

“THEREFORE, leaving the principles of the doctrine of Christ, let us go on unto perfection . . .” (Hebrews 6:1)

The first generation of Hebrew Christians living in and around Jerusalem increasingly faced persecution from their unbelieving families, friends, and countrymen, tempting them to return to their former lives of Judaism, including adherence to Mosaic law and worship/sacrifice at the Temple. The Epistle to the Hebrews is a polemical tour-de-force expounding on why such a return is both logically and spiritually impossible. Because of the supremacy of the Person of Christ and the finality of His sacrificial work on man’s behalf that fully propitiated God, it is impossible for Jewish believers to return to the Mosaic system of worship (cf. Gal2:18; Heb10:38); but to do so would diminish the Person of Christ and make His unique, once-and-for-all sacrifice appear ineffectual (Heb10:9-10,18). Thus, the only course available for the believer is to press on to spiritual maturity in Christ (Heb6:1; 10:32-39; 12:1-2; Cp., Gal3:23-25).  In that light, it is even more inconsistent for Gentile Christianity, for whom the Old (i.e., Mosaic) Covenant never applied (cf. Eph2:11-12), to embrace elements of that now obsolete Jewish system (Heb8:13).

I began teaching a weekly class on the Epistle to the Hebrews in September 2018.  The notes and audio for this study are updated regularly.  You can find them under the Biblical Studies menu; check periodically to follow the study as it progresses.  God bless!


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